2010/06/21

More 2011 porn



More info and pictures stolen from cyclingnews.com and mtbs.cz about the 2011 Cannondale mountain bike range, starting with the Scalpel Ultimate.


It's pretty much a Flash Ultimate with a rear suspension, the geometry is almost a perfect match and the weight difference between both has shrunk.


Sleek, smooth, one piece front and rear triangles are now one unit, one stiff, light, strong racing unit. 1565gr with shock. The travel is now reduced to 80mm and the geometry is racier than the previous generation so it's definitly a race bike without compromise compared to the very behaved and trail usable bike that was the second generation...


The new Lefty SL with XLR, SRAM's Xloc hydraulic remote, behind the new stem/steerer.


The new stem now has 15mm of height adjustability but still drops a few grams. The smooth look is intended to inflict less pain if you bang your knee on it in a crash or bobble.


The Scalpel 2, as well as the whole Scalpel range, use the same frame, same carbon layup as the Ultimate. This time, no alloy version, it could not be close enough to what carbon has allowed, especially the one piece, continuous fibers BB and chainstays part.




The Flash 29er looks like it just has a new, very nice paint job right? No, it now uses a Hi-Mod carbon mix like the 26" Flash Carbon Hi-Mod frame to now weigh 1050gr, a diet of around 100gr.


There is a very slick looking single speed, full rigid 29er. With slicks, that could be a nice commuter.


The Jekylls are available in carbon (with the top model 25lbs with 150/90mm travel dual rear shock, Fox 32 Talas FIT RLC fork, that's light!) but the above Jekyll 3 and below have alloy frames that, thanks to Cannondale's typical double pass smooth welds, extensive tube shaping, are looking almost exactly the same as the carbon ones. There are also women specific models, called the Scarlet.


The Jekyll's Dyad-RT2 shock from above was thought of by Cannondale, developped with, then manufactured by Fox.


The Jekyll's bigger brother, the 180mm travel Claymore. Similar in technology but tougher, bigger, more travel and tuned more for the descent than the uphill even though it probably climbs much better than everything in it's class.

You can read the article on cyclingnews.com and soon other cycling websites for more details, more pictures and specs. Impressive new things I think but it's not all, there are more things to come...

1 comment:

jmilliron said...

"There is a very slick looking single speed, full rigid 29er. With slicks, that could be a nice commuter."

/sigh

Roadie.